We Help Entrepreneurs and Families 

Keep the Skies Clear and the Future Bright

Sky Unlimited Legal Advisory offers you the perfect combination of trusted advisor, problem solver, keeper of secrets and deep listener

 

Our attorneys are specifically trained to help you keep more money in your business and personal accounts, watch out for pitfalls, handle sticky situations (ideally before they even get sticky) and effectively tend to the parts of your business that are especially challenging.

 

At the same time, we work as your trusted advisor who helps you make the very best personal, financial, legal, and business decisions for your family throughout your lifetime.

  

You always said you wanted someone who could do all “that” stuff - the tasks that you’d rather not handle.

 

That's precisely where we step in - protecting your business and your family!



Notes from Our Chief Counsel's Desk


Everything You Need To Know About Including Digital Assets In Your Estate Plan - Part 2

Recent advances in digital technology have made many aspects of our lives exponentially easier and more convenient. But at the same time, digital technology has also created some serious complications when it comes to estate planning. In fact, if you haven’t properly addressed your digital assets in your estate plan, there’s a good chance that most of those assets will be lost forever when you die.

Without the proper estate planning, just locating and accessing your digital assets can be a major headache—or even impossible—for your loved ones following your incapacity or death. And even if your loved ones can access your digital property, in some cases, doing so may violate privacy laws or the terms of service governing your accounts. Plus, you may also have certain digital assets that you don’t want your loved ones to inherit, so you’ll need to take steps to restrict or limit access to those assets.

 

There are a number of special considerations you should be aware of when including digital assets in your estate plan, and this series addresses each one. Last week in part one, we discussed some of the most common types of digital assets and the current legal landscape governing what happens to those assets upon your death or incapacity. Here, we offer some practical tips to ensure all of your digital assets are properly included in your estate plan, so these assets can provide the most benefit for your loved ones for generations to come.

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The Advantages Of Using Arbitration To Avoid Litigation

Whether it’s with an employee, client, a vendor, or a business partner, going to court to resolve a dispute is something you want to avoid at all costs, since even if you wind up winning your case, getting caught in the court process is time-consuming, expensive, and almost never good for your company’s reputation. To this end, the next time you find yourself in a dispute, you might consider attempting to resolve the matter through alternative dispute resolution (ADR).

ADR refers to a variety of processes, such as mediation and arbitration, that help disagreeing parties resolve a dispute without resorting to litigation, and it is becoming increasingly popular with both business owners and the judicial system. Some courts even require you to use ADR before you can bring a case to trial, and it’s standard practice for big businesses to include a clause requiring ADR before litigation in their agreements. 

 

Indeed, whether you know it or not, if you use Facebook, Amazon, or Netflix, you’ve agreed to participate in ADR when you agreed to the company’s Terms Of Service. You might want to consider adding an ADR clause to your agreements, and if so, we can help with that.

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Everything You Need To Know About Including Digital Assets In Your Estate Plan - Part 1

Recent advances in digital technology have made many aspects of our lives exponentially easier and more convenient. But at the same time, digital technology has also created some serious complications when it comes to estate planning. In fact, if you haven’t properly addressed your digital assets in your estate plan, there’s a good chance that most of those assets will be lost forever when you die.

Without the proper estate planning, just locating and accessing your digital assets can be a major headache—or even impossible—for your loved ones following your incapacity or death. And even if your loved ones can access your digital assets, in some cases, doing so may violate privacy laws or the terms of service governing your accounts. Plus, you may also have certain digital assets that you don’t want your loved ones to inherit, so you’ll need to take steps to restrict or limit access to those assets.

 

Indeed, there are several special considerations you should be aware of when including digital assets in your estate plan. Here we’ll discuss the most common types of digital assets, along with the current laws governing them, and then we’ll offer some practical tips to ensure your digital property is properly accounted for, managed, and passed on in the event of your incapacity or death.

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What You Should Know About Your Website's Terms Of Use

Although it’s the likely most boring part of your website, having a well-thought-out Terms of Use page for your company’s website is a smart move. Your Terms of Use page set the rules for your company’s website, and going without one opens your business up to a number of unnecessary risks.

Also known as “Terms and Conditions” or “Terms of Service,” your Terms of Use function as a legally binding agreement between your business and those who use your website. As such, your Terms of Use protect your company from liability by formally notifying users of the rules of your website and how your website’s content may, and may not, be used by others.

 

While you should work with us as your Family Business Lawyer™ to help create your Terms of Use, here we’ll discuss the basics of what these agreements should include and why they are so important. Keep in mind that depending on your specific business and whether or not you sell products or services online, your Terms of Use agreement may need to include much more expansive provisions than those covered here.

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Britney Spears’ Nightmare Conservatorship Underscores The Vital Importance Of Incapacity Planning—Part 2

Since the age of 16, when she burst onto the charts with her debut single, “...Hit Me Baby One More Time,” Britney Spears has been one of the world’s most famous and beloved pop stars. Yet despite her massive fame and fortune, Britney, who is now 39, has never truly had full control over her own life.

As most familiar with pop culture know by now, Britney has been living under a conservatorship for the past 13 years, known as “adult guardianship.” A conservatorship is a legal structure in which the court granted Britney’s father, Jaime Spears, and other individuals nearly complete control over her legal, financial, and personal decisions. The conservatorship was initially established in February 2008 after Britney suffered a mental breakdown, which resulted in her being briefly hospitalized.

 

A Total Loss of Control

Back in 2008, the court appointed Britney’s father and attorney, Andrew Wallet, as her co-conservators, as Britney was deemed mentally unfit to care for herself. The arrangement was only meant to be temporary, but in October of that year, the conservatorship was made long-term, and her father has remained in nearly complete control of Britney’s life ever since. 

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